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School of Law

Sacha Waxman

PhD Bioethics and Medical Jurisprudence

Sacha Waxman - PhD student at the School of Law, The University of Manchester
Sacha Waxman's research focuses on the interaction of ethics in law and regulation.

Why did you choose to complete your research degree at Manchester?

I completed an MA here in 2005 and not only loved the course but the Law School, the staff and the environment on campus. After practising law for several years I decided to return to postgraduate research and coming back to Manchester was my first choice.

What’s your current research about? Why did you choose this topic?

My research is very focussed on the interaction of ethics in law and regulation. I concentrate very much on when the Welfare of the Child principle is engaged in the regulation of human reproduction, more specifically when IVF/PGD are utilised by prospective parents. I have just completed my first paper which challenges the retention of the WOC principle in regulation and the second paper offers more of a critique of what we presume are the ethics embroiled within the principle.

What do you most enjoy about studying here?

The balance here is perfect – in the sense that staff are on hand within the Law School more or less all the time and each of them makes themselves available to you if you need help, not just your supervisors. So the feeling of a supportive community is very strong.

Equally, the academic staff leave you to your own devices all the time, so that you can concentrate on your work and have some peace of mind in your own research. Add on to that the sense of community within the student body; everyone gets along great and the general environment is really rewarding, supportive and focussed.

The availability of literature is amazing and the library support staff make life incredibly easy when you need to track down something that is not very easily accessible.

Have you been involved in any of the Law School’s societies and events?

I have attended numerous conferences during the academic year. Most recently, the annual Postgraduate Bioethics Conference was hosted at the University, which I and another PGR student organised. Presentations were made by international students, other PGR speakers and an incredible range of academic staff. It was a brilliant conference and supported by the Law School.

What are your plans after graduation?

I wish to embark on an academic career, whether that be teaching or research based, or both. I am still practising law in the City and although I do not wish to give up my practising certificate fully I certainly want to make the change into academia. I love research; so many areas of law, regulation and health care fascinate me. I would love to teach the law and inspire young students like I was inspired when I started out years ago.

What advice would you give to new research students at the Law School?

Do not underestimate the work you need to put in for this. Plan ahead if you are considering postgraduate research and the funding opportunities that are available.

You will do this only once so enjoy the process and go for it. Absorb everything you learn like a sponge and you will reap the benefits later in years to come. And of course, enjoy your social time at University. It is very much about striking the right balance.

  • Find out more about a PhD in Bioethics and Medical Jurisprudence